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Managing A Forced Job Change

Aug 17, 2007
Job changes are not always pleasant phases for everyone. Many employees who have been forced to change their jobs for some reason or the other have failed miserably to manage this phase in their lives, and ended up in bad scenarios. When a job change causes you anxiety, it can be unsettling, to say the least!

Let's look into what causes people to arrive at this stage and whether it applies to employees of all age groups. Finally, we will see the steps one needs to take to safeguard his/her career and avoid trauma.

Reasons For Anxiety

A first job change for people in their late 20s and early 30s is a big challenge. It is especially daunting when expenses have gone through the roof and they have the additional responsibilities of supporting their families and raising children.

The phenomena of forced job changes are not new. Many people in the 20-30 year old age group will have bitten off more than they can chew, and a forced job change unsettles their lives. The reasons for a forced job change could range from a falling-out with the boss to downsizing or a company relocation.

Not having another job before you give up your present one is what can hurt you the most. The thoughts of staying home until you can find another job can be agonizing.

Then there are the monthly bills, which can't be ignored. Most people in this age group will have bought cars or have a home and mortgage, which in all likelihood will be still new.

This anxiety related to a forced job change is not limited to any particular age group. Young employees new in their jobs and the workforce, often chuck their jobs on an impulse. If it takes a long time to get another job, the reason they left their jobs in the first place will haunt them.

Accept The Reality

You have reasons to believe that you were loyal to the organization, but you still need to accept the reality of your situation. Job losses are not new and you are not the only one that has found themselves in that situation. Self-pity and other negative thoughts will only make the situation worse. Immediately engaging in either job search or some activity will help to keep you active and divert your mind away from negative thoughts.

Take big strides, get out there and search for a job! It is not necessary to find a job exactly like your first one. It is quite possible that you have picked up many skills than you had at your first job. You can pursue one of them if there is a promising career prospect for it. Handling job interviews likewise should not be a problem. However, if you feel that you need practice in this area, by all means practice with a relative or friend.

A forced job change can be a scary event. The important thing to remember is that if you prepare well, and jump right back into the job hunt, you will eventually be successful.
About the Author
Tony Jacowski is a quality analyst for The MBA Journal. Aveta Solution's Six Sigma Online offers online six sigma training and certification classes for lean six sigma, black belts, green belts, and yellow belts.
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