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A Hotel And Restaurant Management Career Might Be For You

Aug 17, 2007
A career in hotel and restaurant management might be for you if you like to make important decisions, hire staff and run the day to the day operations of your business. It might sound like fun stuff but it is hard work. As a manager, you will be the first one to arrive and the last one to leave. All responsibility will fall on you. The perks of being in hotel and restaurant management business, however, can be great.

As a manager, you are responsible for everything that goes on in your hotel or restaurant. You need to have food orders in on time, make sure guests are accommodated for and ensure that your staff respects and listens to you. You must be a great communicator and leader to succeed in hotel and restaurant management.

Whether it is a high profile hotel, a glamorous restaurant or a small deli, a manager must indulge himself in the business. If one thing goes wrong it falls on the manager's shoulders. The service industry is the biggest industry in the United States today. It garners more attention and customers than any other business in the country. Don't expect this trend to stop.

Small businesses are currently thriving in the U.S. More and more of these offices are popping up everywhere. Combine that with the stature of the service industry and a small hotel or restaurant can prove to be quite profitable. Being involved in hotel and restaurant management is becoming a common experience for many people today. People with little to no experience are getting into the business. But those who do the best have a degree specializing in management.

It's a great time to become restaurant manager. The U.S. Department of Labor cites the field of restaurant management as an emerging industry, and predicts it will continue to do so. As a restaurant manager, you are responsible for the day-to-day operations of the restaurant. Not only must you have a love of food, you must also have a background in management.

A restaurant manager needs to ensure food deliveries. Manage personnel, and enhance the customer experience. But of course that's also part of the reward - you get to enjoy the satisfaction of knowing that a successful restaurant was the result of your service skills. And not only will you have to fare well with your customers, you'll have to fare well with your staff. Managers must communicate well with the employees, motivate the staff, and lead by example.

In restaurants that change their menu items, manager often select new dishes. They consider what items have been popular in the past, and what foods on hand must be used. Then they analyze recipes to decide costs for food and labor. Based on this analysis, they assign menu prices.

Managers are often responsible for recruiting and hiring new kitchen and serving staff. They organize and direct worker training programs. In addition, they schedule staff work hours and assign duties. They may also evaluate employee performance.

Large restaurants often have bookkeepers. However, managers of small facilities often have administrative duties. For example, they keep records of employee hours and wages. They prepare payroll and tax report paperwork. They keep records of purchases and pay suppliers. They also evaluate the success of new dishes and remove them from the menu if they are not profitable. Some managers use computer software to help them with these record-keeping duties.

Almost three-fourths of all food service managers were previously restaurant managers, according to Bureau of Labor Statistics. Most restaurant management professionals receive a two- or four-year degree in restaurant or food service management.

Nine out of ten restaurant operators raise money for charities, or donate food or space.

Restaurants fight hunger, support health-related causes, mentor youth, and improve their communities. If you're just starting out or your restaurant wants to increase its philanthropic efforts, you may donate money to support a children's hospital, United Way, local non-profit, museum, library, school, zoo, military support group or homeless shelter.

High standards need to be maintained, and health and hygiene safety regulations need to be met at all times. This includes the quality of raw ingredients and prepared food, food storage, and customer service. The maintenance of equipment, stock and the budget is also controlled by the restaurant/catering manager.

Many independent hotels, and most hotel chains, run management trainee schemes that can lead into restaurant or catering management. Fast-food chains, catering companies and large restaurants are also likely to run restaurant management trainee schemes. Some employers may take on candidates with A levels, BTEC National awards, or Scottish Highers. However, it is more usual for entry requirements to include a foundation degree, BTEC HNC/HND, or degree. Relevant subjects you can study at this level include hospitality management with business, culinary arts or marketing, and international hotel and restaurant management.

The entry requirements for a degree are likely to include five GCSEs (A-C)/S grades (1-3) and a minimum of two A levels/three H grades. For a HNC/D or foundation degree, you are likely to need four GCSEs (A-C)/S grades (1-3) and one A level/two H grades.

An Access to Higher Education qualification may also be accepted for entry to certain courses. If experienced in a related field, you may be able to gain recognition of skills through Accredited Prior Learning (APL). Please check with colleges or universities for exact entry requirements.

There is no maximum age limit to become a restaurant or catering manager.

Training is usually provided on the job. In addition, you can work towards a qualification such as an NVQ/SVQ Level 3 or BTEC National Certificate in Hospitality Supervision.

If you are a graduate with a degree not related to hospitality, you can take a one year BA (Hons) conversion degree course in Hotel and Catering Management, or Hospitality Management.

Restaurant or catering managers can take a number of routes into different careers. Hotel management is an option. In a large chain of hotels or restaurants, it may be possible to progress to regional or area management.
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