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Learning Disability Related Careers

Aug 17, 2007
More information is being discovered about learning disabilities everyday, and with this growth in knowledge comes an increase in the number of people diagnosed with scholastic difficulties. Because of this, professionals trained in helping people to overcome their learning problems are needed now more than ever. This is a fascinating field and if you choose to take part in it, you can feel good about embarking on a career path that will enable you to help people in need improve the quality of their lives. There are a host of learning disability related jobs available, including:

1. Pediatrician
A child's doctor is often the primary line of defense against learning problems. Nowadays, pediatric tests are able to identify possible disabilities earlier than ever before. Still, if symptoms manage to keep themselves hidden for a while, as soon as they're discovered, the pediatrician will be the first person that a child's parent will contact. For example, if an 18-month-old child doesn't seem to understand or respond to his or her parent's speech, the parent may bring this up with their pediatrician, who will first test the child's hearing. If his or her hearing is fine, then the child will be referred by the pediatrician to a speech pathologist.

2. Speech Pathologist
These licensed professionals are trained to assess a child's speech development and point out any potential problems. When a child is sent to a speech pathologist, he or she will be tested for the ability to speak and to understand the speech of others. If a problem is identified, the speech pathologist will suggest that he or she begin speech therapy as soon as possible, since the sooner a learning disability is dealt with, the easier it will be for him or her to make the transition to school.

3. Teacher
The right instructor for your child will have the time and the training necessary to work with learning disabled students. This may be a general or special education teacher, depending on the severity of your child's scholastic problems. General education teachers may obtain the necessary training from workshops or classes offered by private schools, nonprofit organizations, or learning centers that specialize in working with students who have scholastic difficulties. Special education teachers are trained to work with students who may have one or more of a variety of disabilities, including cognitive, physical, and social disorders.

4. Tutor
Sometimes outside help is needed to assist your child in making the most of his or her educational opportunities. If this is the case, you may want to hire a specially trained tutor to teach your child the strategies that will allow them to interpret the information that is relayed to them in their schoolwork. Tutors may be independent contractors or work at learning centers. They might be former general or special education teachers, or they may have receive their training via workshops or classes.
About the Author
Jane Saeman runs an In-Home Tutoring service called Aim High Tutors. Find out about how to help your student reach their full potential at http://www.aimhightutors.com/blog
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