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For Leaders Only--Listen Up! How Reviving a Lost Art Can Explode Your Business

Aug 18, 2007
I answered the phone today. It's something I rarely do anymore, and I was reminded why the instant I heard the voice on the other end. I honestly don't even remember what she was selling, but I do remember some key phrases. "People just like yourself" always pushes my buttons, and when she used it, I almost interrupted, but decided to allow her to ramble on about how wonderful whatever it was truly was.

She talked at me. She had no clue who I was, what my goals were, what ails me, or how her product/service could solve my problems. Even though she was a live person, she was still a machine, reading from a script to no one in particular. I was a printed name on her lead sheet, complete with telephone number. I had no feelings, no life experience, or face. I was part of the proverbial wall that she was throwing stuff against, seeing how much would stick.

When she finished, I asked her for her first name. A brief pause, then, "Erica." I proceeded to ask Erica several more questions: How long had she been doing this? Did she like it? What attracted her to this kind of work? Several times she tried to switch back to selling mode, but the exhilaration of talking about herself won out. She had three kids, had recently obtained her real estate license, and was trying to sell her house. She changed her own oil in her car, sang Janis Joplin songs in the shower, and her favorite movie was anything starring Johnny Depp. By the end of the conversation, we had become friends, even though she knew almost nothing about me. I politely declined her offer, but she thanked me anyway. It was a positive experience for both of us.

I've no doubt that if I presented Erica my business opportunity after I had respected her by truly listening to what she had to say, that she would have been quite receptive. We've all heard it said that people like to buy, but not to be sold. When they buy, they'd rather buy from someone they consider a friend, or at least somebody they like.

Nothing exists that causes people to feel more comfortable than asking questions and listening attentively to their answers. Not only the words, but listen for the meaning behind the words.

For example, few people want money just for the sake of having it. If someone says their big "why" is to have more money, ask them why. You might get something like, "I want buy a house in the Florida keys." Asked why a house in the keys and you might get, "We spent our honeymoon there. It was so awesome that we both decided that, if we could ever afford it, we'd live there." The underlying problem is ALWAYS attached to emotion.

Many refer to this as a consultative approach. When using questions to initiate dialogue, you take the focus off yourself and your opportunity, and place it on your prospect. This has two major advantages.

Firstly, by focusing on your prospect's wants and needs, you virtually eliminate any anxiety associated with picking up the phone. You're not expected to perform, just listen.

Secondly, this process allows you to know the root issues in this person's life that need to be addressed. Then, when it comes time to present your opportunity, not only will this person be more receptive, you will be able tailor your presentation to suit her individual needs.

This is not a cookie-cutter, "People just like yourself" approach. We get bombarded by that crap every day. Most of us see it coming from miles away, and are now immune to it.

Unless and until you get inside your prospect, start thinking the way he does, and understand what he wants and why, you'll not see the phenomenal results achieved by the heavy hitters in this industry.
About the Author
Gregory McGuire is a successful network marketer living in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. "Stop wasting time on old school network marketing techniques -
find out why 97% of mlmers never make any real money."
http://success123.the7greatliesofnetworkmarketing.com/seven11.html
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